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Friday, April 22, 2011

Kind of a random collection of reports and thoughts.

Classes are almost over for the semester. I have one more full day of classes next Monday, but then it's reading period for a week until finals begin. I have 5 exams again this term, but I feel less stressed about it. I'm not sure if that's good or bad. Maybe high stress yields good exam performance? We'll see.

A lot of my classmates are worrying about our business associations final (that class deals with things like the governing of various business entities, such as general partnerships, limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, and closely-held [non-public] corporations). It's a statutory class, which is why I think a lot of people are worried. They tend to be a little harder, I think, because not only do you have a written code that is technically the law, but you also have cases that may interpret and apply that code differently, so the state of the law can be more complex than in areas that are mainly case-law driven, even though you would think areas of law that aren't written down in a code would be more complicated.  But my sales class last semester, which was also a code course, was much harder, so I'm not really feeling the same sense of urgency about business associations. That may or may not backfire on me.

As for my summer job search, I sent off a couple more applications but have not heard anything on them. I also sent a nudge to the small firm that would have me doing copyright issues part time, and they actually said they are still interested in filling the law clerk position, and again said they would get back to me on interviewing. It sounds like they are uber-busy with their recent firm move, which I can understand. It does make me feel better to think that might still be on the table. It seems like it would be a good job for me.

Now let's talk about some non-law school things: TV, for instance. Recently, I have been watching some old TV series on Netflix (which, at $10 a month and commercial-free, seems to be a much better deal than cable or satellite), and I'm a little bit startled that people who used to look old to me now look like contemporaries, more or less. For instance, I just began watching Ally McBeal, a show that I saw a few episodes of back in high school, but never really followed. Back then (10 years ago now, imagine that), all the characters on the show looked so old to me. Now, most of them actually look not much older than myself and the people I go to school with. In fact... ok, no. I suspected that Calista Flockhart may have been about my age when the show began, but I just googled it, and it seems she was 33 then, so she had 5 years on me. But considering her character's position as a relatively new lawyer, I guess that figure is not too far off from where I might hope to be career-wise in 5 years. I guess it kind of freaks me out a bit.  What really freaks me out is realizing that I am presently older than Gillian Anderson was when she first played Scully on the X-Files. She always seemed like such an adult to me, such a professional, when I was in junior high and high school. Now I'm as old as she was when she had been playing Scully for 3 or 4 years, and that just doesn't seem right. It is weird how TV characters have a kind of immortality, though. They will always be the age that they were on the show, even 10 or 20 years later. The rest of us do not get that luxury.

You know what I think's maybe the saddest thing about life? You never really arrive. You are always striving for the carrot at the end of the stick that will always be out of reach, no matter where you are. There was a time when I thought that was the whole point of life: to continue reaching for things, for personal betterment. But I think what it really means is that we will never be satisfied. And that, to me, is sad.


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5 comments:

heidikins said...

I hope I never "arrive", because I don't know what I'd do with myself after that. I'd like to constantly improve, but I don't want to arrive because I feel like that means I have lost my sense of reality and actually believe there isn't anything left to work on, no issues to address, nada. And that? That is depressing.

xox

Sra said...

I can understand that, because it's a sentiment I used to hold. I figured if you ever got where you're going, you'd have nothing left to live for. But now I'm thinking it would be nice to feel like you have achieved, and to just be comfortable with that for awhile. I feel like I need a plateau to rest on. Doesn't mean I couldn't pick up the chase once I'm sick of resting.

nova said...

I'm going through the same thing! Actually just today I was in an elementary school gym (to vote, haha) and they had one of those big collapsible gymnastics set-ups...I remember it looking GIGANTIC. Today it looked like I could climb to the top in three strides. And ... last week I found myself thinking Bill Cosby in the first few seasons of the Cosby show was "kinda good looking". WHAT THE!!?? Isn't he like, a grandpa age? hahaha

Sovknight said...

I loved Ally McBeal. I didn't realize it was on Netflix though. I will have to check it out.

The age of the actors thing only gets worse as you get older. I've realized that I'm now older than most of my favorite actors were when they performed their prime or most notable roles. It's depressing.

It is true that you never actually arrive in life. But then, would you want to? I hope that you can find fulfillment in accomplishments, but I think you should always strive to be better. Life is about learning and growing and reaching for that new experience and higher level of understanding. You've arrived when you die, and hopefully, in that moment, you can look back over your life and say "Ah. Now I get it."

B.R. said...

The never-really-arriving thing is a good thing. It's what makes our individual pursuits of professional and personal interests worth anything, really. Mystery needs to accompany conscientious effort. The former adds a good measure of appeal, I find. I'm a fan, I have to say.

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