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Sunday, October 11, 2009

Happy Columbus Day

When I was a child, Columbus Day was another day off from school. Aside from the fact that I could really go for a bit of a holiday from school right about now (come on, you know you'd appreciate a day off too), I think it's a shame that we stopped observing the date.

I'm sure the break in observance was brainchilded (if I can verbalize a weird noun) during the overcorrective political correctness movement of the 90's. Columbus was a bad man who brought disease and death to the native peoples of this continent. And, on top of that, he didn't even DISCOVER America, despite what they taught when I was a kid.

Yes, yes. True. And Thomas Jefferson and George Washington had slaves, but we don't entirely discount their value to our history, now do we?

Nor should we completely discount the historical significance of Columbus coming to America. Columbus's trips to the Americas were the catalyst of European colonization of the Americas. Maybe if we are to be decent human beings, we ought to wish that colonization never happened, for the sake of the native peoples that arrived here long before the Vikings and the Lamanites made their way to the American continents. But in life, bad things sometimes, nay often, lead to good things. Sure, our history is replete with darkness, but I am here today in part because of the darkness that was the Europeanization of the American continents. And I don't feel bad about celebrating that.


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5 comments:

sov said...

I think the Lamanites sank in Lake Michigan, no? Isn't that where they found the "barge"?

And don't forget the Jews that came over in their magical wooden submarine, laden with all manner of creatures, people, and enough food to last 341 days of crashing beneath the waves, all while cramped into a vessel that was "tight unto a dish" and as long as a tree, with only a small hole in the top and a small hole in the bottom with which to both receive fresh air and expel CO2 and, er... animal byproducts. But I digress...

I was taught that Columbus was a great man who discovered America. Of course, that's completely wrong, but you referenced this and you made some great points about what his actual accomplishments really do mean. It gave me pause, and you are right. Thanks.

Sra said...

I think that bungehole dish barge was from the Jacobites, wasn't it? The Lamanites and Nephites came over together in their own Jewish paddle boat, and then (I misspoke before) the Lamanites turned into the American natives while the Nephites died out from all the warring.

sov said...

You might be right. I can't keep all the fake history straight. This also makes me wonder how much real history is correct? What do we really KNOW about Columbus?

sov said...

You might be right. I can't keep all the fake history straight. This also makes me wonder how much real history is correct? What do we really KNOW about Columbus?

sov said...

I think the Lamanites sank in Lake Michigan, no? Isn't that where they found the "barge"?

And don't forget the Jews that came over in their magical wooden submarine, laden with all manner of creatures, people, and enough food to last 341 days of crashing beneath the waves, all while cramped into a vessel that was "tight unto a dish" and as long as a tree, with only a small hole in the top and a small hole in the bottom with which to both receive fresh air and expel CO2 and, er... animal byproducts. But I digress...

I was taught that Columbus was a great man who discovered America. Of course, that's completely wrong, but you referenced this and you made some great points about what his actual accomplishments really do mean. It gave me pause, and you are right. Thanks.

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