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Sunday, September 14, 2008

Should've taken a hike from Ike

This is where I make myself sound like a heartless bitch again, but if there is a huge tropical storm coming straight for your city, and you are ordered to evacuate the city, but you choose to stay behind and ride the storm out, then I don't feel sorry for you when your dead or alive body has to be pulled out of the wreckage by rescue crews.



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23 comments:

Claire said...

Nah, no worries, Sra - you're saved from heartlessness by the fun little rhyme in your post's title.

The judges also would've accepted "Hurricane brings lots of rain, best to flee, so use your brain."

sovknight said...

I have a friend that lives south of Houston, right where Ike hit. He left the day before, going up to Dallas where his daughter lives.

I read several reports of people who were staying, and most of them has this nonchalant attitude about it. I wonder how many of them are dead now? You don't FUCK with Mother Nature. EVER.

Sra said...

Claire - glad to know that I can employ rhyme whenever I wish to mitigate my heartless bitchery.

Sov - I'm glad your buddy has some sense. Seriously, unless you have a steel bunker under your house, you are insane to stick around through that.

Sarah Bellum said...

Look me up when you're in hell and let's go out for drinks.

B.R. said...

Alas, many other factors play a role in some people's decision to stay put. It's also rather costly and simply unaffordable for some to move from their homes to other, safer areas for a few days. And this, in and of itself, is indeed perturbing. Information is power, no doubt, but information coupled with resourcefulness and financial strength translates to a better, final outcome.

jess said...

i'm so with you on this! i was talking to my husband about it yesterday. why do people stay? can they NOT afford to leave? do they think the weather dudes are wrong? hello? did the see what ike did to cuba?? how can they doubt that?

they stay - and then people like firefighters, policeman and everyday joe heroes risk their lives to save them. it pisses me off.

i'd find a way to leave whether i could afford it or not. they set up shelters for those kind of things...

Sra said...

Sarah - You, Me, Satan, and shots of Firewater. I'll see you in hell!

B.R. - You're right, nothing is ever black-and-white simple. I can't say this for sure, but I think at least Galviston was offering free bus transport out of the city, since it was a forced evacuation and not voluntary. That of course doesn't take care of lodging expenses and maybe not even travel back. But then again, I feel like if you've chosen to build a home in a hurricane zone, you ought to put aside an emergency fund for just such an escape emergency. You may not get hit dead on every year, but you'll get hit eventually and you might as well have a safety net set up for yourself. I know that in these wretched financial times and our culture of living on credit that a lot of people can't afford to have an emergency fund, so that's not the end-all solution either. But when it's fight or flight and your life is on the line, I'd think it would be prudent to do anything you can to get out of the danger zone.

But congratulations, you win the rational compassion award for the day ;)

Sra said...

Jess - I've heard that some people just didn't think the storm would be that bad, even though they were told they faced certain death if they stayed. I don't know what it is. People can be very stubborn.

amyeliz said...

B.R. said it perfectly.

Living in Miami Beach, I've been ordered to evacuate many times. I did the first time, which basically consisted of going to work, once I was there, the hurricane was downgraded to a TS. Residents of Miami Beach rarely evacuate. Because it's coastal, any threat above a category 2, comes along with a mandatory evacuation.

I've been through at least half a dozen hurricanes, and Wilma nailed my neighborhood. The scariest storms I've experienced are the early evening summer storms. These are scarier and more intense than any of the hurricanes I've been through.

Sra said...

Fair enough. I live in a dry, mountainous desert, so I really can't speak from experience about storms. But here's how I still feel on the matter, as an outsider: if you want to risk your life in spite of warning, that's fine, but since that is your choice, I still don't feel sorry for you when/if you need help.

amyeliz said...

I think I've just been really lucky so far. Especially since I moved here after Andrew. If we were told it was a life or death situation, I'd book the first flight out of here, or just go to work. The building I work in is hurricane proof, and provided shelter and food to all of the employees when Andrew destroyed south Miami in 1992.

My ideal situation would be to spend hurricane season in Utah.

The Over-Thinker said...

I don't get it either. Will you save a shot of firewater for me?

Trovan said...

I feel bad for any loss of life, to a degree. But when the main instrument in your demise is your own stupidity, you kind of had it coming.

@amyeliz: I think your example of sticking it out when told to flee is a little different. It may not be stictly wise, but not nearly as retarded as these people staying through a cat-4 or cat-5.

And I'm just glad it was Texas this time. If we have to take in refugees here in Utah again, I really don't want anymore New Orleansians.

Sra said...

Yes, O-T, there will be plenty of firewater to go around. Looks like we're gonna need a case or two.

Karen said...

Sra - Here is where it becomes tough to go through a situation like this....when, upon dealing with a difficult on it's own situation, you read comments from people who try to make you feel stupid for living where you live.

I'm live in New Orleans. As you can imagine, I've been thru my fair share of disasters. I am a single mother of two, with a fiance who is still in school. As you can imagine, money is extremely tight. Without the help from my parents, I never would have been able to evacuate from Katrina, which annihalated our area.

When Gustav was heading into the Gulf, the mayor of New Orleans deemed it the "mother of all storms", and predictions that it would be 100 times worse than Katrina came barrelling in from those in positions of authority we've come to trust in such times as these.

Once again, we found ourselves in a situation where we had to depend on family. My mom paid for our food and hotel rooms, and my sister-in-law, who is stationed in Iraq, paid for fuel costs. Without their help, we would have had to stay. It cost our family over $1,000 to evacuate. If another hurricane comes along, I can't readily guarantee that my parents will be able to do it again.

We've discussed the possibility of moving to a different state, but that's at least two years out, as my fiance is still in school. Our children are quite young, and as you can imagine, moving them away from their loved ones and everything familiar is a difficult choice to make.

Our situation is tough enough, so please.....if you encounter someone who has seen the tragedy that we've lived with, muster up some compassion.

I don't blame you for wondering why we stay. Because really, how could you possibly understand? But still...it hurts just the same.

Sra said...

Karen, thank you for your heartfelt comment. I know you live in New Orleans. I'm not trying to call you or anyone else who lives in a hurricane zone stupid for living there. I don't mean to be offensive, but on my blog, I am honest about what I feel, and sometimes that means that I end up offending people.

Utah has very, very benign weather, which is something we are very lucky for and something we take very much for granted. Sure, the snowy winters suck, but in the grand scheme of hurricane zones, tornado zones, earthquake zones, flood zones, hail-the-size-of-your-head zones, and so forth, we in the West are quite lucky. I want you to know that I do recognize this, and that I know I can't truly understand things from the perspective of someone who lives in these zones and has to deal with these threats in real life and not just on TV.

Ok, having said that, I still hold my stance that no matter where you live, you need to be prepared for the dangers in your area as much as possible. In tornado alley, you have underground bunkers. In hail zones, you have a strong carport. In earthquake zones, you secure the items on your walls and shelves. In hurricane zones, you have an escape plan. But in spite of preparations, tragedy cannot always be avoided. I am sympathetic to that. I am also sympathetic to the fact that fleeing can be expensive.

As for compassion, I have compassion for people who are struck by tragedy without warning, or in spite of preparation, or in spite of doing whatever they can to avoid it. I'm afraid I don't have compassion for people who make the choice to risk their lives in spite of fair warning.

I'm sorry that I can't make that leap. And I'm sorry that I've hurt your feelings and that I probably haven't made it any better with this. But that's all I can do.

Karen said...

Sra - You said it in a much nicer way that has been said by many others in recent weeks, so my feelings aren't hurt. I just wish that people realized that not all of us who decide to stay have the option. Sure...there are a LOT of foolish rednecks who think that it's a thrill to ride these storms out. They even go so far as to have parties. It's ridiculous, and it gives others from these parts (now I sound redneck!) a bad name.

You haven't offended me, but many others have by calling us ignorant for even living here. I just wanted to give you a point of view from someone who has actually lived it.

I enjoy your blog very much, and will continue to do so.

Karen said...

And also...if you're feeling particularly compassionate, you can write letters to congress. Because the truth of the matter is that the government has screwed the citzens of the gulf coast by not giving us our equivalent to "underground bunkers".

The levees held this time...but only because Gustav was a Category 1. Anything 3 or more will put us right back to the days of Katrina.

Sra said...

Karen, I am much humbled. You know what? I will put a letter to congress regarding this matter on my to-do list. As I once realized when I ate some yucky oatmeal, revolution is the spice of free life.

Sra said...

Karen, I am much humbled. You know what? I will put a letter to congress regarding this matter on my to-do list. As I once realized when I ate some yucky oatmeal, revolution is the spice of free life.

Karen said...

Sra - You said it in a much nicer way that has been said by many others in recent weeks, so my feelings aren't hurt. I just wish that people realized that not all of us who decide to stay have the option. Sure...there are a LOT of foolish rednecks who think that it's a thrill to ride these storms out. They even go so far as to have parties. It's ridiculous, and it gives others from these parts (now I sound redneck!) a bad name.

You haven't offended me, but many others have by calling us ignorant for even living here. I just wanted to give you a point of view from someone who has actually lived it.

I enjoy your blog very much, and will continue to do so.

Sra said...

Karen, thank you for your heartfelt comment. I know you live in New Orleans. I'm not trying to call you or anyone else who lives in a hurricane zone stupid for living there. I don't mean to be offensive, but on my blog, I am honest about what I feel, and sometimes that means that I end up offending people.

Utah has very, very benign weather, which is something we are very lucky for and something we take very much for granted. Sure, the snowy winters suck, but in the grand scheme of hurricane zones, tornado zones, earthquake zones, flood zones, hail-the-size-of-your-head zones, and so forth, we in the West are quite lucky. I want you to know that I do recognize this, and that I know I can't truly understand things from the perspective of someone who lives in these zones and has to deal with these threats in real life and not just on TV.

Ok, having said that, I still hold my stance that no matter where you live, you need to be prepared for the dangers in your area as much as possible. In tornado alley, you have underground bunkers. In hail zones, you have a strong carport. In earthquake zones, you secure the items on your walls and shelves. In hurricane zones, you have an escape plan. But in spite of preparations, tragedy cannot always be avoided. I am sympathetic to that. I am also sympathetic to the fact that fleeing can be expensive.

As for compassion, I have compassion for people who are struck by tragedy without warning, or in spite of preparation, or in spite of doing whatever they can to avoid it. I'm afraid I don't have compassion for people who make the choice to risk their lives in spite of fair warning.

I'm sorry that I can't make that leap. And I'm sorry that I've hurt your feelings and that I probably haven't made it any better with this. But that's all I can do.

Karen said...

Sra - Here is where it becomes tough to go through a situation like this....when, upon dealing with a difficult on it's own situation, you read comments from people who try to make you feel stupid for living where you live.

I'm live in New Orleans. As you can imagine, I've been thru my fair share of disasters. I am a single mother of two, with a fiance who is still in school. As you can imagine, money is extremely tight. Without the help from my parents, I never would have been able to evacuate from Katrina, which annihalated our area.

When Gustav was heading into the Gulf, the mayor of New Orleans deemed it the "mother of all storms", and predictions that it would be 100 times worse than Katrina came barrelling in from those in positions of authority we've come to trust in such times as these.

Once again, we found ourselves in a situation where we had to depend on family. My mom paid for our food and hotel rooms, and my sister-in-law, who is stationed in Iraq, paid for fuel costs. Without their help, we would have had to stay. It cost our family over $1,000 to evacuate. If another hurricane comes along, I can't readily guarantee that my parents will be able to do it again.

We've discussed the possibility of moving to a different state, but that's at least two years out, as my fiance is still in school. Our children are quite young, and as you can imagine, moving them away from their loved ones and everything familiar is a difficult choice to make.

Our situation is tough enough, so please.....if you encounter someone who has seen the tragedy that we've lived with, muster up some compassion.

I don't blame you for wondering why we stay. Because really, how could you possibly understand? But still...it hurts just the same.

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