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Wednesday, January 9, 2008

Seeking Millionaire: Dating for the Rich and Fabulous!

Are you single, wealthy, and beautiful? Are you tired of wading through the seemingly endless supply of ugly, poor single people who are desperate to get a piece of your good looks and finances? Then Seeking Millionaire is just the dating site you're looking for!

While some people consider it shallow to assess a potential mate based solely on looks and wealth, we at Seeking Millionaire understand that wealth and beauty are the only assets that truly matter, and we know you wouldn't settle for anything less than perfect in your mate.

Our rigorous selection standards ensure that you won't be bothered by messages from average singles. Only genuinely beautiful people and millionaires or people who make at least $100,000 per annum are allowed into our pool of desirable singles.

So if you are rich, beautiful, and single, apply today. The illusion of happiness is waiting for you!




The above is (obviously) a fake ad of my own making for an actual, honest-to-god millionaire dating site. (Thanks to Ian for the link!)

Here's a quote from the actual site:

Some people may think it is superficial to focus only on
WEALTH and BEAUTY when finding a mate. But let's face it... it's only human nature to be attracted to these two important qualities.

And here's what I have to say about beauty:

Beauty is a quality that is both relative and absolute. It's absolute because there are some people that everyone will agree are beautiful (like Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, damn their eyes!). It's relative because there are some people who are beautiful to some, plain to others, and ugly to still others. And even after this first impression of beauty is formed, that impression may be influenced by other factors. People who we are not initially attracted to may become beautiful to us once we find out what a great person they are. Conversely, people who are intrinsically beautiful may become unappealing once we find out how shallow and self-centered they are. This relative factor outweighs the absolute factor. And even if it didn't, beauty fades, absolutely, for everyone. Even Paul Newman.

And here's what I have to say about wealth:

People mistake wealth for happiness. What they fail to see is that everyone has the same financial problems, no matter the income or wealth level. The problems just rear their ugly heads on a different scale. Have you ever noticed that you never seem to have more money after you get a raise? That's because you don't really -- you have adjusted your spending level according to the increased income. You aren't as careful with your money, because you don't have to be now that you make more. It's the same thing for poor people and wealthy people alike: you will always "need" more money, and if only you just had more, you could finally be happy. It's an illusion; a carrot dangling from a string in front of your face. You will never find happiness through money.

For a couple years in college, about 4 years ago, I made roughly $300 per month working part time as a file clerk for a law firm. My full time job was going to school and earning my degrees. I was lucky enough to have earned a scholarship that paid for my tuition, but I still needed to cover rent, food, utilities, entertainment, and school fees and books every semester. My rent was $163 per month, since it was split 4 ways amongst my roommates and myself. So I had about $137 per month to cover the rest. Luckily, utilities were also split 4 ways, but sometimes things were tight. I had to bargain shop, and sometimes I had to choose between buying food and buying entertainment with friends. Sometimes I bought the food, and sometimes the entertainment. I had to lie on my credit card application because I didn't make the required $8,000 per year to qualify for a card. But I got the card and a $500 limit in case I couldn't make ends meet, and that happened sometimes. But even though it was tight, and I was worried about money sometimes, those were still some of the happiest years of my life thus far. Money didn't matter, because I didn't have it, so I found true happiness in myself.

The moral of this story:

Money doesn't buy happiness, and beauty doesn't last forever.

I'm not going to say that these qualities absolutely don't matter when it comes to dating and relationships. To say that beauty isn't important is to kid yourself. Attraction is important. You don't want to be with someone who repulses you. And to say that finances aren't important is naive. More relationships break up over money issues than anything else. But at the end of the day, there are far more important things in life and in choosing your mates than just beauty and money. Like compatibility, intelligence, humor, kindness, understanding, and communication.

In the end, it's the whole picture that ought to be considered.

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3 comments:

Katie Peterson said...

I'm going to go ahead and quote a statistic that a friend quoted to me. I've never read the study myself, but my roommate read a study that said happiness increases with income up to $50,000/year (this is, of course, among Americans). Past that point, income makes no difference. It makes sense to me. With $50,000, one can buy a decent house, car and all the basic necessities of life without a care in the world. At lower incomes, things can be tight, which is stressful. Higher incomes, on the other hand, only allow people to buy bigger houses, nicer cars and organic fruits and veggies. Let's face it, eating conventionally grown food and living in a 1500 sq foot house never hurt anyone. Long live the middle class!

Sra said...

I will agree with there being a slight correlation between money and happiness. (I think I read that same study on Yahoo.) There is such thing as too little money. Even at my poorest, I don't think I was quite there, but it could be stressful at times, nonetheless.

Beyond covering basic necessities comfortably, though, money will not buy happiness.

Moderation is key.

Katie Peterson said...

I'm going to go ahead and quote a statistic that a friend quoted to me. I've never read the study myself, but my roommate read a study that said happiness increases with income up to $50,000/year (this is, of course, among Americans). Past that point, income makes no difference. It makes sense to me. With $50,000, one can buy a decent house, car and all the basic necessities of life without a care in the world. At lower incomes, things can be tight, which is stressful. Higher incomes, on the other hand, only allow people to buy bigger houses, nicer cars and organic fruits and veggies. Let's face it, eating conventionally grown food and living in a 1500 sq foot house never hurt anyone. Long live the middle class!

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